HomeTechnologyNewsFake Windows 10 updates infect you with Magniber ransomware

Fake Windows 10 updates infect you with Magniber ransomware


Fake Windows 10 updates are being used to distribute Magniber ransomware in a massive campaign that started earlier this month.

In recent days, BleepingComputer received a wave of requests for help regarding a ransomware infection targeting users around the world.

While investigating the campaign, we discovered a thread on our forums where readers are reporting that they were infected with Magniber ransomware after installing what is believed to be a Windows 10 cumulative or security update.

These updates are distributed under various names, with Win10.0_System_Upgrade_Software.msi [VirusTotal] and Security_Upgrade_Software_Win10.0.msi being the most common.

Other downloads pretend to be cumulative updates for Windows 10 and use fake knowledge base articles, as shown below.

System.Upgrade.Win10.0-KB47287134.msi
System.Upgrade.Win10.0-KB82260712.msi
System.Upgrade.Win10.0-KB18062410.msi
System.Upgrade.Win10.0-KB66846525.msi

Based on submissions to VirusTotal, this campaign appears to have started on April 8, 2022 and has had massive worldwide distribution ever since.

While it is not 100% clear how fake Windows 10 updates are promoted, the downloads are distributed from fake warez and crack sites.

Fake warez and crack sites that power Magniber
Fake warez and crack sites that power Magniber
Source: BleepingComputer

Once installed, the ransomware will delete Shadow Volume Copies and then encrypt your files. When encrypting files, the ransomware will add a random 8-character extension, such as .gtearevf, as shown below.

Files encrypted by Magniber
Files encrypted by Magniber
Source: BleepingComputer

The ransomware also creates ransom notes named README.html in each folder containing instructions on how to access the Magniber Tor payment site to pay a ransom.

Magniber ransom notes
Magniber ransom notes
Source: BleepingComputer

Magniber’s payment site is titled ‘My Decryptor’ and will allow a victim to decrypt a file for free, contact ‘support’ or determine the ransom amount and bitcoin address victims are required to pay.

Magniber Tor payment site
Magniber Tor payment site
Source: BleepingComputer

According to the payment pages viewed by BleepingComputer, most ransom demands have been for approximately $2,500 or 0.068 bitcoins.

Magniber is considered safe, which means that it does not contain any weaknesses that can be exploited to recover files for free.

Unfortunately, this campaign primarily targets students and consumers rather than business victims, making the ransom demand too costly for many victims.

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