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A quality problem solver

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Ratings:
7/10
?

  • 1 – Absolute Hot Trash
  • 2 – Classify warm garbage
  • 3 – Very flawed design
  • 4 – Some advantages, many disadvantages
  • 5 – Acceptably imperfect
  • 6 – Good enough to buy on sale
  • 7 – Excellent, but not the best in its class
  • 8 – Fantastic, with some footnotes
  • 9 – Shut up and take my money
  • 10 – Absolute Design Nirvana

Price: $85.69

Mark LoProto / Geek Review

The Shimp Mechanical Gaming Keyboard solves problems gamers probably don’t even consider, and it does so with high-quality mechanical inputs and fun RGB lighting. However, with so many essential keys missing, the board is very specific as to who will benefit. Those who do are in luck.

As a gamer, I’m always looking for the next “best thing” the industry has to offer us. We’re often inundated with accessories and peripherals that do the same thing, each touting an iota of difference that barely justifies owning another headset or controller. That’s not the case with The Shrimp, a 25-key mechanical keyboard that looks slicker than it is. The scaled-down board is as clickable as it gets, and its RGB features are vibrant and bold. But focusing on its lesser facets misses the main appeal of this unique keyboard.

With just 25 keys, Shrimp is a much more manageable PC gaming peripheral, allowing you to accommodate your wrist and arm for maximum comfort. There’s certainly a learning curve, and going from a standard board to a smaller layout may seem awkward at first, but mastering the shrimp adds value to gaming sessions.

This is what we like

  • easy to travel with
  • Promotes a more comfortable game
  • Clicky, satisfying and responsive keys
  • Included magnetic wrist rest attaches to the board

And what we don’t do

  • No macro support
  • May be a bit too limited
  • Construction feels a bit cheap
  • Wrist rest could use a bit more padding

Review Geek’s expert reviewers get right down to business with every product we review. We put each piece of hardware through hours of real-world testing and benchmark it in our lab. We never accept payments to endorse or review a product and we never add other people’s reviews. Read more >>

Design: Maximize player comfort

  • Weight: 1.32 lbs (0.6 kg)
  • Dimensions (without rest): 14 x 12.7 x 2.5 cm (5.5 x 5 x 1 in.)
  • Dimensions (with rest): 14 x 19.3 x 2.5 cm (5.5 x 8.8 x 1 in)
  • Detachable Cable: Rubber, USB-C to USB-A

It wasn’t until I started using The Shrimp that I realized that PC gaming is a bit awkward for me. As someone with carpal tunnel syndrome, I often need to take breaks from my keyboard to avoid bouts of unpleasant tingling.

Being forced to rest my wrist at an angle just because of that WASD setup leads to stiffness and, depending on how long I play, median nerve swelling. My main keyboard is heavy and clunky, and there’s little room to maneuver to a more comfortable angle. I don’t want to sound like an infomercial, but The Shrimp helped me rectify all of that.

Because the mechanical keyboard is so small, I can move it around when I need to to maximize comfort. To test how different my comfort level was between the two boards, I ran the “Ghostbusters: Spirits Unleashed” marathon for four hours.

While normally I would have to give my wrist a rest for even just an hour, using The Shrimp, I was able to do it for the full four hours without feeling discomfort. The key was being able to make slight adjustments to the angle as time went on to relieve the pressure.

Being able to shift and move during gameplay might sound like an “old gamer” concern, but it’s actually something a younger audience should consider. The more time you spend typing or gaming with your mouse and keyboard, the greater your risk of ailments like carpal tunnel. The occasional change in wrist angle and the Shrimp’s included sturdy wrist rest help mitigate these factors.

Clicky and responsive

The Shrimp mechanical keyboard with green RGB lighting
Mark LoProto / Geek Review

The Shrimp is like most mechanical keyboards I’ve used, with a few tweaks. The oversized letters may not be entirely necessary, but when illuminated by the vibrant RGB backlighting, they really come to life in a way some RGB motherboards can’t. Cherry profile keys are comfortable under the fingers and everything feels naturally shaped to the human hand.

Now, the real question is: “Is it clicky?” Yes, it absolutely is. The Gateron G Pro yellow mechanical switches offer a satisfying deep click, which is a nice contrast to the harsher clacks of the Keychron Q8 I normally use.

While the Q8 has drawn several comments about my keyboard volume during online gaming, the Shrimp hasn’t received the same criticism.

A style for all tastes

The Shrimp line of mechanical keyboards with each model on display
Mark LoProto / Geek Review

The Shrimp tries its best to fit into most aesthetics with four visually different boards. The monochrome model combines greys, whites and blacks for a sleek, standard look, while the Pinky and Vitello tables emphasize pinks and whites with hints of orange or blue. For something a little more colourful, the Bomber style is a mix of pastel blue and orange with hints of yellow and green along with a graffiti print wristband.

While I’m not normally one to look for anything more than a black keyboard, the white Vitello was too clean and bright not to have on my desk.

Made for gamers on the go

The Shrimp isn’t just about comfort, although that was its biggest value for me. As someone who once frequented local gaming tournaments and remembers my heyday of playing with friends, I see a need for a board that is 20% the size of a standard option. It’s lightweight at just over 0.6kg (1.3lbs) and compact enough to easily fit into a small backpack or laptop bag. It uses a detachable USB-C to USB-A cable and works with any Windows PC or PS4/PS5. Unfortunately, The Shrimp is not compatible with Mac.

Too few keys?

  • switch type: Gateron G Pro mechanical
  • Number of keys: 25

I haven’t come across a scenario yet, but I know there is one where The Shrimp’s 25 keys would be too limiting.

Sure, it helps that my Logitech G502 mouse has some programmable buttons, but games like “Resident Evil Village,” “Ghostbusters: Spirits Unleashed,” and even more complicated titles like “Elden Ring” worked with the board, granting a few remappings required. for some titles. Even without the mouse buttons, I was able to fit all the necessary keys on one board.

To make up for the limited key set, The Shrimp included an Fn key with inputs for media players, RGB speed adjustment and mode cycling, and F1 through F5 keys. It’s not incredibly useful while in-game, and the board lacks any way to set up macros that could expand input options further.

More customization options would have been a nice touch, though not a deal breaker considering the 25 keys cover a surprisingly decent amount of ground.

Should you buy the Shrimp mechanical keyboard?

One of the biggest problems with The Shrimp Mechanical Gaming Keyboard is that it will appeal to a very specific audience. It’s not going to resonate with every gamer, as its limited keyset makes it a hard sell for those who need a wider range of keys to play. Players who travel frequently, whether to enter tournaments or play at a friend’s house, will find the most value on the board. Others who find a standard table too clunky and cumbersome will have their own positive experience.

As much as I love the look of The Shrimp, its price is a bit high. You can find a full-size mechanical keyboard for just a little more. However, Shrimp isn’t trying to replace the standard plate; it is more of a supplement for those who need it. For example, I’ll use it to help alleviate discomfort in my wrist during longer gaming sessions. It has its purpose, and it is important.

Beating the price and small audience, The Shrimp is a wonderful, well-built desk accessory. The Cherry profile and Gateron G Pro switches provide a very comfortable and satisfying user experience, which has really made me want to upgrade my PC and focus more on mouse and keyboard gaming. Being able to create macros and more customization would have been a nice touch, but from my experience, there’s enough on the board that not having the option isn’t a huge disappointment.

I really didn’t expect to appreciate The Shrimp as much as I did, but I’m more than pleased with how the small board has made PC gaming better for me.

Ratings: 7/10
?

  • 1 – Absolute Hot Trash
  • 2 – Classify warm garbage
  • 3 – Very flawed design
  • 4 – Some advantages, many disadvantages
  • 5 – Acceptably imperfect
  • 6 – Good enough to buy on sale
  • 7 – Excellent, but not the best in its class
  • 8 – Fantastic, with some footnotes
  • 9 – Shut up and take my money
  • 10 – Absolute Design Nirvana

Price: $85.69

This is what we like

  • easy to travel with
  • Promotes a more comfortable game
  • Clicky, satisfying and responsive keys
  • Included magnetic wrist rest attaches to the board

And what we don’t do

  • No macro support
  • May be a bit too limited
  • Construction feels a bit cheap
  • Wrist rest could use a bit more padding

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